Music and Vision homepage Jenna Orkin: Writer Wannabe Seeks Brush With Death - From the heights of greatness (the Juilliard School; musicians Rosalyn Tureck and Nadia Boulanger) via way-ward paths to the depths of wickedness these reminiscences will entertain and enlighten.

 

<<  -- 2 --  David Wilkins    SEX AND ART

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There's a slowness, here, to demarcate these three sailors as individuals but that's probably appropriate. They are, initially, of a type. Soon enough Tim Howar's Ozzie is exposed as the primarily horny 'carpe diem' guy. Adam Garcia as Chip takes a little longer to lower his defences (but not too much longer with, one supposes, his bell-bottoms) while Aaron Lazar is the sentimental besottee (spell-checkers don't like that word but it seems reasonable enough to me!). They all sing pretty fabulously and in style. I had a moment or two of doubt when Lazar's Gabey sang the poignant, harmonically searching, Lonely Town with more ingenue displacement than delving angst but, of course, it's absolutely right for the character.

Ozzie (Timothy Howar), Chip (Adam Garcia) and Gabey (Aaron Lazar). Photo © 2005 Johan Persson
Ozzie (Timothy Howar), Chip (Adam Garcia) and Gabey (Aaron Lazar). Photo © 2005 Johan Persson

Sylvia Syms is the drunken singing teacher of which dreams are made from nightmares. Her classic line: 'Sex and art don't mix. If they did, I'd have gone right to the top!' alone justified the night-out for most of the audience. The strangely hilarious role of Judge Pitkin W Bridgework made a show-stealer of Andrew Shore -- a stunningly calculated performance of eyebrows and larynx.

Ozzie (Timothy Howar) and Claire de Loone (Lucy Schaufer). Photo © 2005 Johan Persson
Ozzie (Timothy Howar) and Claire de Loone (Lucy Schaufer). Photo © 2005 Johan Persson

Of the three girls, Caroline O' Connor was the star as the no-holds-barred (all encouraged) taxi-driver, Hildy Esterhazy. Lucy Schaufer as anthropologist (moonlighting as a nymphomaniac) Claire de Loone brought a degree (or two) of classy persona that worked well with her fur-coat and no-knickers essence. Helen Anker as Gabey's idol (Miss Turnstiles AKA Ivy Smith) probably crossed the finishing line with the bronze medal but I'm still unsure whether that isn't the fault of Bernstein -- Comden and Green having far too much fun with the outrageousness of the other pairings. She was, in her own way, completely convincing and sang gloriously.

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Copyright © 16 March 2005 David Wilkins, Eastbourne UK

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